Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘garment’ Category

2017_05_31_finishedjuniper04-Edit

Looky!  I got to test another pattern for Blank Slate Patterns!

This time I worked with the Juniper Jersey pattern, which is a sporty, casual knit top:

2017_05_31_finishedjuniper03-Edit

For this version, I used some medium-weight pink interlock knit with some floral jersey knit that a friend gave to me (recognize it??).

 

I think this is a really great pattern lots of potential for pattern mixing and creative color combinations.  In fact, you could even use this pattern to refashion an oversized T-shirt.

2017_05_31_finishedjuniper05-Edit

I really like the V-neck on this top and the topstitching details.  It is a really fun and fast sew.  Check out the pattern HERE on the Blank Slate site!

2017_05_31_finishedjuniper07-Edit

Read Full Post »

Well then!  Just like that– it’s July!

June flew by for me.  Even though it was filled with so many good things, I felt a bit like I was being thwapped with sticky black orbs like Mr. Incredible (remember that scene from The Incredibles?  If you want a reminder, here’s a link to a clip; the part I’m talking about starts around 2:17).  But in this case the black sticky orbs were good things– they just expanded and filled up my entire month.

That being said, I’ve also been busy with some projects in the few spare minutes I’ve gathered here and there.  I’m hoping to get back onto a more regular posting schedule, and I’m going to start by sharing this maxidress I made by modifying the Blank Slate Patterns Texana Tank!

It took a couple of muslins, but I managed to figure out the best fit for the Texana tank on my body (turns out that even though my straight-up measurements might suggest it, I don’t actually need to make the bust adjustment).

2017_06_14_texanatankmaxi03-Edit

Once I had my pattern established, I traced the bottom half of a ready-to-wear maxidress I own to connect to the waistline of the Texana pattern.  From there, it was a pretty straightforward sew: I made a placket according to the pattern instructions (Melissa’s video is a great help!) using some coordinating black cotton with a tiny white polka dot, and I had the buttons on hand.

2017_06_14_texanatankmaxi04-Edit

The dress fabric (floral jersey knit) was given to me by a friend, and it had been on my mind to use for a sundress as soon as she gave it to me.  I’m so glad it turned out so well (thanks M!).

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I was so excited to be selected as a pattern-tester for the Blank Slate Patterns’ new Barton shorts!  I’ve always wanted to be a pattern tester: I find the process of developing a pattern to be fascinating.

So in about a week, I made four different versions, and I had so much fun. Something about working under a deadline is exhilarating for me (as long as it’s not that way every day!) I find that I am more efficient with my time, and it is so satisfying. Even more satisfying was that this time around, I literally had everything on hand that I needed to make all four pairs!  Fabric, trim, elastic, thread.  No trips to the fabric store to break my momentum! Yippee!

In this post, I’m going to share my two final versions!  They were both actually made from extra fabric from other projects I’ve made.

These shorts are ridiculously comfortable, and in my opinion, they are super cute!  I love the lace-trim version (I was assigned the 3″ inseam, lace-trimmed variation for my testing– the pattern includes two inseam lengths–3″ and 5″, and both a hemmed and trimmed version!!).  I don’t usually wear elastic-waist shorts for everyday going-out, but these are not at all sloppy looking.  They look casual and trim, and I really love them!  And the best part of all– they are a very quick sew!!  The fabric selection took the longest (of course), and once I had that figured out, I estimate that I could make these in 2-3 hours per pair.

First up: my comic book shorts!  These are made with the Barton pattern pretty much as-is, but I did make a rise adjustment in the front so that they fit my body better.

2017_05_10_bartonshortscomicfull01-Edit

Do you recognize the fabric?  It’s extra from when I made my comic book dress!  I also used some vintage bias tape with a lace edge to trim the shorts.  The bias tape came from a large stash of trims that were my Grandma’s.

2017-05-09 15.51.36-Edit

2017_05_10_bartonshortscomicfront-Edit

2017_05_10_bartonshortscomicback03-Edit

Oh yeah, did I mention that there are pockets?!!

2017_05_10_bartonshortscomicside-Edit

For my next version, which is probably my favorite (so far), I used some excess lightweight denim from a strapless sheath I made a couple of summers ago.  As soon as I saw this in my scrap stash, I knew I had to turn it into these shorts… and I was just able to eke them out!  I made the waistband and the pockets from a blue batik (also from my stash), and I trimmed the shorts with some heart-shaped lace– also from my Grandma’s collection.

2017_05_10_bartonshortsdenimfull01-Edit

For this version, I also adjusted the front rise (the same as for the comic book shorts), and I also made these with a slightly decreased thigh circumference for a slimmer look.

2017_05_10_bartonshortsdenimfront-Edit

2017_05_10_bartonshortsdenimback-Edit

And pockets!!  The interior of the pockets is the same batik cotton as the waistband.

2017_05_10_bartonshortsdenimside02-Edit

 

These are seriously the perfect casual shorts.  SO easy to make– and I imagine that there will be more! 😉

Find the pattern at the Blank Slate Patterns website HERE!

Read Full Post »

Easter frills

I jokingly blame this dress on my friend.  We were invited to her family’s Easter celebration, and on the invitation, it said “dress casually or in Easter frills.”  I had the invitation stuck on my refrigerator, and as I looked at it each time I passed by, I started thinking… boy, it’s been a long time since I had a new dress for Easter!

At about the same time, my wonderful Husband put new shelving into my craft room closets (I will write a post about them later on…).  As I pulled out my stash so that he could install the shelves, I had another chance to consider what I’d squirreled away in those closets in bins and just plain piles.  It was mostly fabric in the left-hand closet, and in one of those bins was a large piece of yardage that I’d purchased for a different dress quite a few years ago.  Thankfully I’d made a muslin of that pattern and discovered that the dress shape was terrible for my body shape, but ever since then, I’d been hoping to find just the right project to make with this pretty mint cotton print.

So thinking about the invitation and the closet reorganization connected the fabric with Butterick 6094.  I made it before–my comic book dress!–so I knew it fit.  In fact, even though I said in my previous post about this pattern that I would petite the bodice, when I actually tested this (very scientifically, of course: by pinching a little pleat while I considered myself in the mirror, haha), I decided in the end to leave the bodice pieces as-is.  I also only shortened the skirt by about an inch from the original pattern length, as well.

2017_04_16_easterdress07-Edit

As you can see, I also decided to add some brown bias tape to the seam lines to add a little flair and definition.

2017_04_16_easterdress01-Edit

2017_04_16_easterdress05-Edit

I also added it to the hem and neckline, and used it to define the fold-over back.

2017_04_16_easterdress04-Edit

 

2017_04_16_easterdress12-Edit

Even though I absolutely love this fabric, I know that pale mint green is not a color that flatters my coloring, so the dark brown edging set it off from a direct contrast to my skin.

2017_04_16_easterdress13-Edit

2017_04_16_easterdress08-Edit

The pattern calls for an attached petticoat, and when I made the comic book dress, I debated for a while over whether I should actually make a separate petticoat slip so that I could wear it under other dresses.  In the end, the comic book dress’ petticoat is attached, and I was kicking myself for that a little bit for this dress! …especially since I was up until midnight the night before Easter to get it finished in time 🙂

So this petticoat is a separate garment.  I made it out of lining fabric (mostly because it’s inexpensive, and also because it’s lightweight).  Instead of having it rest at my waist, I actually added the lower bodice pieces (the “midriff”) to the petticoat skirt.  I think it makes for a bit of a smoother line under the dress.  I think I’ll be able to wear this petticoat with another full-skirted dress that I already own, and I wouldn’t put it past me to make another one or two in the future!

2017_04_16_easterdress14-Edit

Of course, I had to take it for a spin!  😉

2017_04_16_easterdress11-Edit

Read Full Post »

Last but not least, possibly my very favorite of our costumes this year– Husband as Flynn Rider.

2016_10_29_flynnrider01-edit

2016_10_29_flynnrider08-edit

flynn_rider_transparent

The main part of this costume is the vest Flynn wears, of course.  I started with Simplicity 4059, view B and made some pretty significant modifications.

2016_10_29_flynnrider04-edit

I found a woman who made a Flynn Rider costume beginning with the same pattern and blogged about it in 2011, and her documentation of the modifications she made to the vest pattern (she also started with Simplicity 4059) were extremely helpful, as were her detailed notes on the vest Flynn wears in the movies.

2016_10_29_flynnrider07-edit

We chose a faux suede in a slate blue that I found on clearance+sale at JoAnn.  I bought two yards and spent about $9 on it!  I consider that a good deal.  We pored over screenshots of Flynn’s vest and analyzed and studied it some more.  I added some width and length to the pattern so that the front would overlap and the torso would be long enough for my tall Husband.  I also “drafted” faux yoke pieces for the front and back and we marked out what seemed to be miles of topstitching lines.  To give the vest the loft in its quilting, I padded the main torso section with a layer of flannel (an old sheet!)  and the yoke sections with an additional double layer of flannel before doing the quilting. Husband drafted the collar (my brain was fried)

2016_10_29_flynnrider05-edit

We collaborated to figure out how to recreate the hook closures.  Husband bought a short length of brass chain at Home Depot and took apart the links– half of them were twisted to form hooks, and we left the other half of the links “whole.”  We devised fabric mounts (for lack of a better word) that involved tiny buttonholes and fabric loops…I was glad to finish that portion of the vest!

Husband wore khaki pants and a white button-up shirt he already owned, but we wanted him to have the rakish adventuring boots that Flynn has–without having to buy much.  Husband had the brilliant idea to turn an old pair of brown pants into a spat-like device that covered boots he already owned to give them to floppy fold-over top (they are also lined with pieces of yet another old sheet!).  We used a swatch of pleather to make Flynn’s spats.  I sewed elastic to the corners to make loops, and we added large brads from my scrapbook stash to look like the studs on Flynn’s.  I didn’t have brass brads, so we used a yellow permanent marker to color some silver ones.  I was amazed what a difference they made!

2016_10_29_flynnrider03-edit

 

To top it all off, Husband grew a beard and shaved it to a goatee for Halloween weekend.  Look at that smolder!

 

 

Read Full Post »

Costumes 2016: Pascal

Our almost-two-and-a-half-year-old son played the part of Pascal in our family costume this year!

2016_10_29_pascal06-edit

 

ef9ee89d41a35ef1f95241eb749c0e5c

 

We started with the basic jumpsuit in Simplicity 1765 in the smallest size published, but it was still over 10″ too long for our boy, since the pattern is really a “child” sized pattern, not a “toddler” sized pattern.  We shortened the pattern and also took out quite a bit of bulk on the side seams.  Since we were making a chameleon outfit and not a dinosaur, we lengthened the tail and changed its shape a bit.  When the suit was assembled, Husband added some strong twisted wire into the stuffing of the tail, and we used that to curl it up.

2016_10_29_pascal10-edit

2016_10_29_pascal26-edit

I changed the feet on the pattern to be more like Pascal’s three toes, and instead of making mittens, which B would have hated for restricting his ability for holding onto things, I modified the feet to make something that is effectively a wristband with three big puffy toes that come out over the hands.  The wristbands are held together with Velcro.

2016_10_29_pascal20-edit

2016_10_29_pascal16-edit

We hand-stitched the head and eye ridges onto the hood and added fabric eyeballs.  To make the eyes, I cut two large circles out of white cotton (old sheet, of course!) and ran a long stitch around the perimeter.  I added some polyfill inside and cinched the stitches.  On the first one, I used a marking pen to determine the placement of the iris and pupil, removed the stuffing and flattened it again. Based on this marking, I used freezer paper templates to paint the iris/pupil onto the flat fabric circles, then cinched them up again with stuffing inside.  At the very end, I added a little catchlight (the white dot) in each eye, and it absolutely amazed me how much of a difference it made– the eyes suddenly looked friendly, rather than staring.

2016_10_29_pascal03-edit

The hood (as well as the hand-toe wristbands) is lined with some fabric from an old dress shirt of Husband’s.  When I realize that there was a likelihood of the lining being visible, I knew I needed to use green fabric– and the only reasonable green I had in my stash was this shirt.  Before I cut anything, though, I made sure that I could also transform the shirt into an apron!  The hood lining was cut from the upper sleeves– it is amazing how much fabric goes into a sleeve!

2016_10_29_pascal23-edit

Stay tuned for Flynn Rider!

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

When we first started discussing the idea of having our family do a Tangled costume this year, it was obvious that V would be Rapunzel, but we debated who would play what other characters.  I absolutely nixed the idea of being Mother Gothel, and after briefly considering Husband and I dressing as Pub Thugs, we eventually settled on my dressing as Maximus, the royal guard horse.

846a2b4e99dce30f5dade4efb5d2d5ac

Instead of taking the costume too literally, we decided to stylize things a bit.  A full horse suit would have been an overwhelming amount of work, and I was already overwhelmed by the amount of sewing for this year’s costumes as it was!  First, we chose a medieval-style dress pattern and added a brown belt to call Maximus’ harness to mind, then topped things off with a stylized horse mask.

2016_10_29_maximus05-edit

2016_10_29_maximus04-edit

The dress is Simplicity 1773, view A, and I wanted a full lining, rather than just facings, since I was sewing it with plain white cotton– an old sheet, to be precise!  To create the lining, I made a second dress, but without sleeves, and attached it at the neckline (as the facings would have been attached).  I sewed the lining to the armholes with a machine stitch, and hand-stitched the zipper opening to the zipper tape in the back.  The lining has a simple overlocked hem, and I did a single turn hem on the outer dress.  I had the sheet and thread on hand, and the zipper and elastic were among sewing notions that I’ve been handed-down from people recently (thank you, thank you, thank you!), and so the only thing I had to purchase for this dress was the buttons.  I didn’t want to spend much–there are nine on each cuff!!!– so I got super cheapo buttons at Walmart: a pack of 20 for $0.88.

2016_10_29_maximus10-edit

Husband was in charge of the accessories, and honestly, I don’t know which one is the better show-stopper!

2016_10_29_maximus07-edit

My horse-head is made from white posterboard (another thing we purchased for my costume).  Husband found an amazing horse mask when he was searching for ideas, and we thought it was beautiful (and prohibitively expensive for our costume purposes!).  As he looked at the pictures, he said to me, “I think I can recreate that!”  And he did.  (His spatial reasoning skills continue to amaze me).

2016_10_29_maximus08-edit

Maximus_harness.png

2016_10_29_maximus09-edit

To create the leather medallion that Maximus wears on the front of his harness, Husband turned to an excellent tutorial on the Epbot blog for making craft foam look like leather.* He used scraps of foam I had leftover from another project and traced Rapunzel’s kingdom’s sun emblem onto the medallion using a template and added the horse’s name, since he spotted it in a closeup in the movie.  The only other thing we purchased for this costume was the gold wax to add the gilding effect.  Of all the characters in our costume, I think I probably needed the most explanation, so it was nice to have such a stylish “nametag.”  It slides onto the belt (from my closet) with a foam loop he adhered to the reverse of the medallion.  After I fasten the buckle, the medallion slides over and covers it.

Stay tuned for Pascal and Flynn Rider!

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »